1. 18:29 26th Aug 2014

    Notes: 5514

    Reblogged from sciencefiction

    image: Download

     
  2. 09:42 18th Aug 2014

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from theoldcuriosityshop

    theoldcuriosityshop:

Corinna Sargood-‘Angela Carter’s Book of Fairy Tales’

    theoldcuriosityshop:

    Corinna Sargood-‘Angela Carter’s Book of Fairy Tales’

     
  3. 09:34

    Notes: 148

    Reblogged from wasbella102

    wasbella102:

Wassily Kandinsky “Cadence”

    wasbella102:

    Wassily Kandinsky “Cadence”

     
  4. 08:29 17th Aug 2014

    Notes: 32330

    Reblogged from jaythenerdkid

    Zuhair Murad Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2008   

    (Source: pagetvbrewster)

     
  5. 08:14

    Notes: 160829

    Reblogged from indigoisbetter

    Think about the first name you were ever called,
    and then think how long it took until
    you got called a pussy
    or a slut,
    or a bitch,
    or a whore,
    all of which are words that fall too close to ‘girl.’

    Think about the first time you got called a ‘girl’
    and they said it with a sneer.
    Like it was a bad thing.

    For a boy, it is the lowest degradation to get called a girl.
    For a girl, it is the lowest degradation to get called a girl.

    Remember, black widow spiders and female praying mantises eat their partners after intercourse.
    Remember, it’s the lionesses who hunt.
    They come back with bloody muzzles, dragging bloated carcasses as the alpha lion strides around with his mane puffing out.
    Remember, it’s only the female mosquitoes who drink blood.
    We’re the ones who do the necessary work, dirty our hands,
    fuck or fight or both.
    We’re often the smaller sex, which makes us a harder target
    as we slink close and sink our teeth in.

    Remember: we’re deadly.

    You should be proud to be called a girl.

    — 'Most Female Killers use Poison,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)
     
  6. 14:00 16th Aug 2014

    Notes: 1886

    Reblogged from purplegril

    purplegril:

    Y.R.U Charii Shoes from dollskill

    aka the most incredible shoes on this planet. The bottoms open up so you can put whatever you want in them and customize them to your own style. 

    Rainbow || Glitter

    I’ll be having some unicorn bitch shoes please kthnxbye

    (Source: wrongremedy)

     
  7. 08:20

    Notes: 2116

    Reblogged from afrodiaspores

    image: Download

    afrodiaspores:


Laura R. Gadson, ”Reception At Ibo Landing,” ca. 2011, a quilt shown in Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore: A Fiber Arts Exhibition, 2012. Filmmaker and author Julie Dash told bell hooks,

The Ibo Landing myth – there are two myths and one reality…
Ibo captives, African captives of the Ibo [ethnic group, also spelled “Igbo”], when they were brought to the New World, they refused to live in slavery. There are accounts of them having walked into the water, and then on top of the water all the way back to Africa, you know, rather than live in slavery in chains. There are also myths of them having flown from the water, flown all the way back to Africa. And then there is the story – the truth or the myth – of them walking into the water and drowning themselves in front of the captors. 
I was able, in my research [for “Daughters of the Dust”], to read some of the accounts from the sailors who were on the ship when supposedly it happened, and a lot of the shipmates, the sailors or other crew members, they had nervous breakdowns watching this. Watching the Ibo men and women and children in shackles, walking into the water and holding themselves under the water until they in fact drowned. 
And then interestingly enough, in my research, I found that almost every Sea Island has a little inlet, or a little area where the people say, “This is Ibo Landing. This is where it happened. This is where this thing really happened.” And so, why is it that on every little island – and there are so many places – people say, “This is actually Ibo Landing”? It’s because that message is so strong, so powerful, so sustaining to the tradition of resistance, by any means possible, that every Gullah community embraces this myth. So I learned that myth is very important in the struggle to maintain a sense of self and to move forward into the future. 

    afrodiaspores:

    Laura R. Gadson, ”Reception At Ibo Landing,” ca. 2011, a quilt shown in Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore: A Fiber Arts Exhibition, 2012. Filmmaker and author Julie Dash told bell hooks,

    The Ibo Landing myth there are two myths and one reality…

    Ibo captives, African captives of the Ibo [ethnic group, also spelled “Igbo”], when they were brought to the New World, they refused to live in slavery. There are accounts of them having walked into the water, and then on top of the water all the way back to Africa, you know, rather than live in slavery in chains. There are also myths of them having flown from the water, flown all the way back to Africa. And then there is the story the truth or the myth of them walking into the water and drowning themselves in front of the captors.

    I was able, in my research [for “Daughters of the Dust”], to read some of the accounts from the sailors who were on the ship when supposedly it happened, and a lot of the shipmates, the sailors or other crew members, they had nervous breakdowns watching this. Watching the Ibo men and women and children in shackles, walking into the water and holding themselves under the water until they in fact drowned.

    And then interestingly enough, in my research, I found that almost every Sea Island has a little inlet, or a little area where the people say, “This is Ibo Landing. This is where it happened. This is where this thing really happened.” And so, why is it that on every little island and there are so many places people say, “This is actually Ibo Landing”? It’s because that message is so strong, so powerful, so sustaining to the tradition of resistance, by any means possible, that every Gullah community embraces this myth. So I learned that myth is very important in the struggle to maintain a sense of self and to move forward into the future. 

     
  8. 08:14

    Notes: 489

    Reblogged from charmpaper

    
Cicely Mary Barker (1895-1973) Illustration of the Queen of the Meadow Fairy for Flower Fairies of the Garden.

    Cicely Mary Barker (1895-1973) Illustration of the Queen of the Meadow Fairy for Flower Fairies of the Garden.

     
  9. 08:13

    Notes: 136

    Reblogged from torbooks

    image: Download

    torbooks:

(via The Reading Room)
What an awesome cake!

    torbooks:

    (via The Reading Room)

    What an awesome cake!

     
  10. 08:11

    Notes: 5707

    Reblogged from stopwhitewashing

    phoenixfalls:

    I remember talking to my mother and seeing Snow White and wondering if there’d ever be Chocolate Brown or something like that. But my parents were very good at making sure I had dolls that looked like me, and books with brown children in them, and birthday cards with brown children on them. They were very aware. When you discount a child from fantasy, it’s a very strong statement. You think, Wow, somebody made an entire movie with elves, and trees that talk, and things that fly, and there was no room for me.

    Anika Noni Rose in Vanity Fair. (Interview by Alex Beggs; Photographs by Justin Bishop.)

    (Source: vanityfair.com)