1. 12:13 21st Oct 2014

    Notes: 810

    Reblogged from mysterysquid

    abandonedography:

    Cappadocia, a region in central Turkey is one of the most exciting and impressive places in this country – and this is saying something because Turkey is huge and quite amazing. Cappadocia is especially famous for its natural formed rocks called fairy chimneys or tent rocks, which look exactly how their name would suggest. As the material of these chimneys is soft, people living in this area have been carving them to form houses they can live in. Some of them are used even to this time and the most notable ones are in Goreme village.

    There’s another secret of Cappadocia, located in the valleys around Goreme. This area was the site of early Christian activity, where people came to flee Roman persecution. There’s still lots of old, forgotten churches and monasteries, with walls painted with Christian symbols and saints. The faces of some figures have been destroyed during the iconoclast period, which opposed showing people on religious paintings.

    Some of the churches are even a thousand years old, now abandoned and used by locals as storerooms. They are literally everywhere in Goreme and you can easily find some to explore.

    The most precious buildings are safe though and protected by the Goreme Open-Air Museum. It’s a vast monastic complex, with churches and monasteries built side by side – and all of them carved in rocks. The impressive frescoes and somewhat mysterious atmosphere of these churches is unmissable and must be on your list if you plan to visit Cappadocia.

    Source: tailsofwonders.com

     
  2. 06:46

    Notes: 18183

    Reblogged from gradientlair

    gradientlair:

    Crown too heavy like the Queen Nefertiti.

    Love!

    (Source: thequeenbey)

     
  3. 06:38

    Notes: 693

    Reblogged from bookmania

    I don’t think man was meant to attain happiness so easily. Happiness is like those palaces in fairy tales whose gates are guarded by dragons: we must fight in order to conquer it.
     
  4. 18:05 20th Oct 2014

    Notes: 206

    Reblogged from radagast

    image: Download

    70sscifiart:

Bruce Pennington

    70sscifiart:

    Bruce Pennington

     
  5. 07:17

    Notes: 45

    Reblogged from western-project

    western-project:

    JESSICA WIMBLEY: The Belle Series
    New Works on Canvas
    In the West Room - October 18 – November 29, 2014

    Western Project is pleased to present the second solo exhibition by Jessica Wimbley. The Belle Series is a group of digital works on canvas based on ideas of origin: biological, genetic, cultural and historic. Working on multiple conceptual levels and visual modes, the series is hauntingly narrative and subjective. Her constructs also use ‘biomythography’ (originally a literary form created by the poet Audre Lorde) which blends elements of autobiography, the novel and personal mythology. It weaves together these elements into new kinds of representational compositions. She writes:

    In my work, I investigate and question identity and history, merging both the genetic and biological with socio-historical, creating narratives that shift between micro and macro representations. The one-drop rule -a historical colloquial term in the United States for the social classification as Black of individuals with any African ancestry; i.e. any person with “one drop of Negro blood” was considered black, is used as a framework to consider the formation of identity. The one-drop rule is still utilized in forming understanding of race in America, however, is problematized in an era of shifting demographics, integration, and multi consciousness. Furthermore, the information contained in the “one drop” of blood in conjunction with contemporary understandings of genetics and anthropology reveals implicit and explicit identities; with subsequent narratives that reveal differing yet simultaneous histories. By investigating the one-drop rule at a micro level (DNA and genetic information contained) to a macro level (origin of humanity) the African diaspora is reframed in the context of the African as the original colonizer and explorer of the earth. Using aesthetic elements such as collage, digital imagery, appropriation, panoramic landscapes and space imagery, as well as images of microscopic biological entities, including t cells, melanin, stem cells, and DNA, provides both a conceptual and visual metaphor for the macro and micro- galvanizing what is seen and unseen, and questioning the scope of the human experience and identity. The figure in these narratives straddles both objectification and subjectification, as a result, creating narratives that conjure multiple histories through the codification of landscape, objects, and the body.

    Literary references to science fiction novels by Octavia Butler, as well as popular culture media are used to compose narrative, in conjunction with photographic images, painting and drawing. The hybridity of images in the work reflect the way in which one composes culture in the digital age, integrating gazes by reflecting the mass consumption and democracy of the internet. The finished work reflects historical artistic approaches of painting and drawing with Photoshop, collage and digital photography, itself becoming a hybrid.

    The Belle Series continues the investigation of identity by integrating images of myself with my grandmother, great grandmother, and other relatives dating back to the early 1900’s and historical stereographic images of Native and Black American women from the Turn of the Century. The stereograph, being a popular medium for disseminating images of Americans during the Turn of the Century, was also instrumental in helping create visual representations of American life and inform American identity. Through the merging of images, I seek to create a hybrid, which exposes the shifting of identities in relationship to both historical and social political understandings.

    The five canvases in the exhibition are but a portion of the Belle Series. They are masterful meditations on ancestry and heritage; becoming universal musings by the shifting micro/macro, intimate/cosmic imaging. Her pictures present an unorthodox way of looking at family; challenging notions of authorship and lineage - perhaps a most useful set of windows to reconsider our limited definitions and assumptions about who we think we are, and the stories we believe.

    Jessica Wimbley is the co-curator and participant of the upcoming exhibition, Biomythography: Secret Poetry and Hidden Angers, at the East and Peggy Phelps Galleries, Claremont Graduate University Claremont, CA. Her work was recently featured in "The Beautiful: Contemporary Art Featuring America" curated by Rachel T. Schmid, at California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks, CA, and “ANEKANTAVADA Diverse Perspectives in Art” curated by Karin Skiba and Quinten Bemiller at Norco College Gallery, Norco College, Norco, CA. She has also shown at Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Chaffey College, Rancho Cucamonga, CA, the Athens Institute of Contemporary Art in Athens Georgia, California State University at Long Beach, California, National Palace of Culture/Lessedra Gallery in Sofia, Bulgaria, 21st Century African Youth Movement, Sierra Leon, Africa, and other galleries and institutions in the United States.

    The artist lives and works in Claremont, California.

     
  6. 06:36

    Notes: 51

    Reblogged from afrofuturistaffair

    image: Download

    neffyfrofro:

The return to old favourites. Octavia Butler #WildSeed. I love #ScienceFiction and #Afrofuturism

    neffyfrofro:

    The return to old favourites. Octavia Butler #WildSeed. I love #ScienceFiction and #Afrofuturism

     
  7. 13:53 19th Oct 2014

    Notes: 2128

    Reblogged from bookporn

    image: Download

    
by photosbygerardo:
Library.

    by photosbygerardo:

    Library.

     
  8. 09:51

    Notes: 143766

    Reblogged from hipsterbrigadier

    image: Download

    spooky-darth:

dduane:

reddyrabbit:


What angels are apparently supposed to look like.
They had 6 wings, covered with eyes on the wings. And had two eyes on their face, but used 2 wings to cover their face at all times because if a mortal ever saw their face they would die.
 The bible mentions multiple faces, being covered in eyeballs, constant singing, lion heads etc.
 Besides being described as beasts and monsters, they’re practically brainless drones. Heavenly angels are only one step removed from demons. The only difference is demons fell from heaven because they chose to follow Lucifer, who was an angel (angel of music and one of god’s favorites). So they are these eyeball covered animal mashed up monsters who were only created to worship for eternity (part of humanities creation was so that something would choose to love god, not just worship him because they were created to).
Angels fall into a lot of new age and conspiracy beliefs.We were taught that the supernatural realms went in the order of Heaven, Hell, then Earth. So when the angels fell from heaven with Lucifer, some fell through hell and landed on Earth. We were taught they intermarried with early humans and created giants and taught witch craft to women.
 They’re abominations, they’re alien, they’re beyond us. They’re creatures that biology as we know it does not apply to. Often they do not love mankind, they love God and God alone.

Yeah, the few times that angels show up in front of people in the Old Testament in a human form, they’re glowing and their skin looks like its made of molten metal; scaring the piss out of anyone who sees them. I think Gabriel even admits to Daniel that he’s having to conceal his true power level, because Full Angel Mode would scramble a regular human’s brain.
Angels are fucking horrifying.

C.S. Lewis’s notes on this subject as they appear in the foreword to The Screwtape Letters are interesting.

It should be (but it is not) unnecessary to add that a belief in angels, whether good or evil, does not mean a belief in either as they are represented in art and literature. Devils are depicted with bats’ wings and good angels with birds’ wings, not because anyone holds that moral deterioration would be likely to turn feathers into membrane, but because most men like birds better than bats. They are given wings it all in order to suggest the swiftness of unimpeded intellectual energy. They are given human form because man is the only rational creature we know. Creatures higher in the natural order than ourselves, either incorporeal or animating bodies of a sort we cannot experience, must be represented symbolically if they are to be represented at all.
These forms are not only symbolical but were always known to be symbolical by reflective people. The Greeks did not believe that the gods were really like the beautiful human shapes their sculptures gave them. In their poetry a God who wishes to “appear” to a mortal temporarily assumes the likeness of a man. Christian theology has nearly always explained the “appearance” of an angel in the same way. It is only the  ignorant, said Dionysius in the fifth century, who dreamed that spirits are really winged men.
In the plastic arts these symbols have steadily degenerated. Fra Angelico’s angels carry in their face and gesture the peace and authority of heaven. Later come the chubby infantile nudes of Rafael; finally the soft, slim, girlish, and consolatory angels of nineteenth century art, shapes so feminine that they avoid being voluptuous only by their total insipidity — the frigid houris of a tea-table paradise. They are a pernicious symbol. In Scripture the visitation of an angel is always alarming; it has to begin by saying “fear not.” The Victorian angel looks as if it was going to say, “There, there.”


When they tell the people they appear to in the Bible not to be afraid, it’s not, “don’t be startled by my sudden arrival.” They’re saying, "HUMAN DO NOT FEAR THE SIX WINGED MOLTEN METAL FORM THAT IS MY BEING."

    spooky-darth:

    dduane:

    reddyrabbit:

    What angels are apparently supposed to look like.

    They had 6 wings, covered with eyes on the wings. And had two eyes on their face, but used 2 wings to cover their face at all times because if a mortal ever saw their face they would die.

     The bible mentions multiple faces, being covered in eyeballs, constant singing, lion heads etc.

     Besides being described as beasts and monsters, they’re practically brainless drones. Heavenly angels are only one step removed from demons. The only difference is demons fell from heaven because they chose to follow Lucifer, who was an angel (angel of music and one of god’s favorites). So they are these eyeball covered animal mashed up monsters who were only created to worship for eternity (part of humanities creation was so that something would choose to love god, not just worship him because they were created to).

    Angels fall into a lot of new age and conspiracy beliefs.We were taught that the supernatural realms went in the order of Heaven, Hell, then Earth. So when the angels fell from heaven with Lucifer, some fell through hell and landed on Earth. We were taught they intermarried with early humans and created giants and taught witch craft to women.

     They’re abominations, they’re alien, they’re beyond us. They’re creatures that biology as we know it does not apply to. Often they do not love mankind, they love God and God alone.

    Yeah, the few times that angels show up in front of people in the Old Testament in a human form, they’re glowing and their skin looks like its made of molten metal; scaring the piss out of anyone who sees them. I think Gabriel even admits to Daniel that he’s having to conceal his true power level, because Full Angel Mode would scramble a regular human’s brain.

    Angels are fucking horrifying.

    C.S. Lewis’s notes on this subject as they appear in the foreword to The Screwtape Letters are interesting.

    It should be (but it is not) unnecessary to add that a belief in angels, whether good or evil, does not mean a belief in either as they are represented in art and literature. Devils are depicted with bats’ wings and good angels with birds’ wings, not because anyone holds that moral deterioration would be likely to turn feathers into membrane, but because most men like birds better than bats. They are given wings it all in order to suggest the swiftness of unimpeded intellectual energy. They are given human form because man is the only rational creature we know. Creatures higher in the natural order than ourselves, either incorporeal or animating bodies of a sort we cannot experience, must be represented symbolically if they are to be represented at all.

    These forms are not only symbolical but were always known to be symbolical by reflective people. The Greeks did not believe that the gods were really like the beautiful human shapes their sculptures gave them. In their poetry a God who wishes to “appear” to a mortal temporarily assumes the likeness of a man. Christian theology has nearly always explained the “appearance” of an angel in the same way. It is only the  ignorant, said Dionysius in the fifth century, who dreamed that spirits are really winged men.

    In the plastic arts these symbols have steadily degenerated. Fra Angelico’s angels carry in their face and gesture the peace and authority of heaven. Later come the chubby infantile nudes of Rafael; finally the soft, slim, girlish, and consolatory angels of nineteenth century art, shapes so feminine that they avoid being voluptuous only by their total insipidity — the frigid houris of a tea-table paradise. They are a pernicious symbol. In Scripture the visitation of an angel is always alarming; it has to begin by saying “fear not.” The Victorian angel looks as if it was going to say, “There, there.”

    When they tell the people they appear to in the Bible not to be afraid, it’s not, “don’t be startled by my sudden arrival.” They’re saying, "HUMAN DO NOT FEAR THE SIX WINGED MOLTEN METAL FORM THAT IS MY BEING."

    (Source: nospheratusblack666)

     
  9. 16:44 18th Oct 2014

    Notes: 852

    Reblogged from littlewoodenhell

    image: Download

    deathandmysticism:

Walter Hege, Erechtheion, The Porch of the Caryatids, Greece, 1928

    deathandmysticism:

    Walter Hege, Erechtheion, The Porch of the Caryatids, Greece, 1928

     
  10. 14:18

    Notes: 103

    Reblogged from a-spoon-is-born

    image: Download

    a-spoon-is-born:

Oree: Pinup Style

This is award-winning artist Lee Moyer’s pinup-style rendering of Oree Shoth from The Broken Kingdoms, which will represent the month of September in the new forthcoming CHECK THESE OUT: Literary Pinup Calendar for 2013.
I talked awhile back about the creation process for this, but now I see the final product and… wow. I love it. I especially love that she’s not looking at the viewer, not just because she’s blind but also because it conveys the total artistic focus that’s so much an element of her personality. She knows you’re there, looking at her; she knows she’s naked; she knows she’s in a tree; these things are unimportant because she’s got an image burning up her creative brain. This pose is in partial defiance of pinup tradition, Moyer explained when we first discussed it, because a pinup usually caters to the male gaze by having the model stare seductively at the viewer. Of course Oree’s like, eff that, got stuff to do. At the same time she’s beautiful enough to turn a god’s head and she knows it. It’s this unselfconscious acceptance of her own beauty that makes this work as a pinup — for me, anyway, because I can’t think of anything sexier than a woman who knows and loves herself.
I think this is awesome. Now — ’cause I know ya’ll are gonna ask — I do visualize Oree as very dark-skinned, and I mentioned this to the artist when I saw an earlier draft. He noted that the lighting — necessary to depict the visible magic of her painting, and of Madding’s symbolic presence, and of the Tree itself — does impact how her coloring comes across. Given the detail and the color of the lighting, that makes perfect sense to me. That’s how her hair is supposed to look, too; the style I described her wearing in the book (natural with a two strand twist-out) is the way I used to wear my own hair. If you’re wondering, Moyer used a live model for this pose; she’s credited as Favour Kibs, a Kenyan-born runway model with the Model Mayhem agency. I haven’t met her, but she’s obviously a beautiful woman, and I’m honored that she was willing to lend her likeness to my character.
via  nkjemisin.com

    a-spoon-is-born:

    Oree: Pinup Style

    This is award-winning artist Lee Moyer’s pinup-style rendering of Oree Shoth from The Broken Kingdoms, which will represent the month of September in the new forthcoming CHECK THESE OUT: Literary Pinup Calendar for 2013.

    I talked awhile back about the creation process for this, but now I see the final product and… wow. I love it. I especially love that she’s not looking at the viewer, not just because she’s blind but also because it conveys the total artistic focus that’s so much an element of her personality. She knows you’re there, looking at her; she knows she’s naked; she knows she’s in a tree; these things are unimportant because she’s got an image burning up her creative brain. This pose is in partial defiance of pinup tradition, Moyer explained when we first discussed it, because a pinup usually caters to the male gaze by having the model stare seductively at the viewer. Of course Oree’s like, eff that, got stuff to do. At the same time she’s beautiful enough to turn a god’s head and she knows it. It’s this unselfconscious acceptance of her own beauty that makes this work as a pinup — for me, anyway, because I can’t think of anything sexier than a woman who knows and loves herself.

    I think this is awesome. Now — ’cause I know ya’ll are gonna ask — I do visualize Oree as very dark-skinned, and I mentioned this to the artist when I saw an earlier draft. He noted that the lighting — necessary to depict the visible magic of her painting, and of Madding’s symbolic presence, and of the Tree itself — does impact how her coloring comes across. Given the detail and the color of the lighting, that makes perfect sense to me. That’s how her hair is supposed to look, too; the style I described her wearing in the book (natural with a two strand twist-out) is the way I used to wear my own hair. If you’re wondering, Moyer used a live model for this pose; she’s credited as Favour Kibs, a Kenyan-born runway model with the Model Mayhem agency. I haven’t met her, but she’s obviously a beautiful woman, and I’m honored that she was willing to lend her likeness to my character.

    via  nkjemisin.com